Plato’s reading suggestions, episode 125

put down the smartphoneHere it is, our regular Friday diet of suggested readings for the weekend:

As If! An entirely uninspiring review of what nevertheless sounds like a really fascinating book by Anthony Appiah.

Jordan Peterson and fascist mysticism.

The dark truth about chocolate. (It’s not a health food, just a pleasant treat.)

What we know and don’t know about losing weight. We know that low carbs vs low fats doesn’t make a difference. And genetics neither.

Put down the damn smart phone! It’s rude, and it’s bad for your health.

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Categories: Plato's Suggestions

62 replies

  1. On the subject of diet, let’s take note that more and more research indicates animal studies are less and less reliable; http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/04/clinical-trials-may-be-based-flimsy-animal-data

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  2. leonids

    You are using the word diet in the sense of the food a person habitually and permanently eats, whereas I am using the word in the sense of a person temporarily restricting their intake of food or certain kinds of food in an effort to lose weight.

    Temporarily restricting your intake of food is fine as long as you want to temporarily lose weight.

    As I said, I think this is a misconception that a diet is something you can do for a little while to fix a problem and then stop and you are fine.

    What is the most commonly heard problem about diets? That they put the weight right back on. Yes, because they stopped the diet and went back to doing the thing that made them overweight in the first place, so of course they are going to become overweight again. What did they think would happen? That a temporary restriction of intake of food would change their body to not gain weight?

    So the distinction you are making is the problem, there is no distinction. There are dietary habits that will result in weight gain, dietary habits that will result in weight loss and dietary habits that will result in you staying the same weight.

    If you want to lose weight and then stay at that weight then you have to adopt the dietary habit that results in you staying the same weight and you can’t stop, you have to continue that for as long as you want to stay the same weight.

    So it is important to ensure that the dietary habit you adopt to stay the same weight is not some kind of endurance event.

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